Dr Barrie Peck

BSc, PhD DIC
Lecturer
Group Leader
Twitter
Research Focus

My lab aims to understand the alterations in metabolism that take place in cancer and investigate whether extrinsic factors, such as diet, influence cancer metabolism and disease trajectory. We then want to uncover whether these dependencies can be exploited therapeutically.

PhD studentship available in my lab.

Key Publications
  • Acetyl-CoA Synthetase 2 Promotes Acetate Utilization and Maintains Cancer Cell Growth under Metabolic Stress. Cancer Cell (2015) 27(1):57-71. PMID: 25584894 
  • Inhibition of fatty acid desaturation is detrimental to cancer cell survival in metabolically compromised environments. Cancer & Metabolism (2016) 4:6. PMID: 27042297
  • The glutathione redox system is essential to prevent ferroptosis in clear cell renal cell carcinoma cells. Oncogene (2018) 37(40):5435-5450. PMID: 29872221
  • 3D modelling identifies novel genetic dependencies associated with breast cancer progression in the isogenic MCF10 model. Journal of Pathology (2016) 240(3):315-328. PMID: 27512948
Major Funding
  • 2019-2022 - Barts Charity, Understanding the role of cancer metabolism at the nexus of diet and tumour microenvironment
Other Activities
  • Member of the British Association for Cancer Research
  • Member of the European Association for Cancer Research
Research

My lab aims to understand the alterations in metabolism that take place in cancer and investigate whether extrinsic factors, such as diet, influence cancer metabolism and disease trajectory. We then want to uncover whether these dependencies can be exploited therapeutically and whether dietary modulation can increase their efficacy.

The altered metabolism of tumor cells is not a new concept in cancer biology. In the early 1920s, Otto Warburg established that cancerous tissues have an altered metabolism compared to their non-tumorigenic counterparts and satisfy their bioenergetic demands by shifting from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) to glycolysis. Although this shift decreases the efficiency of ATP production per molecule of glucose, it favors the shuttling of metabolic intermediates to biosynthetic processes required for macromolecule biosynthesis, i.e. production of proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. Cancer cells are able to satisfy at least part of their demand for lipids through anabolic metabolism of nutrient-derived carbon. We have shown that lipid metabolism is important under the unfavourable conditions encountered in the tumour microenvironment, uncovering several metabolic genes that are essential in cancer, including SREBPs, FABPs, ACSS2 and SCD. More recently, utilizing our 3D functional genomics pipeline we have identified recurrently altered novel tumour suppressors, whose loss results in a fundamental rewiring of cancer metabolism. Together, this gives us a number of biomarkers and tractable nodes to target in cancer, with which we can assess the intrinsic and extrinsic factors that drive tumour biology and disease progression.

To investigate these dependencies we utilise functional genomics (RNAi), genetic perturbation modalities (CRISPR/Cas9) and small molecule inhibitors in combination with cell culture techniques that are more similar to the unfavourable tumour microenvironment encountered in vivo (cancer cell line spheroids).

Current projects:

  • Elucidating the impact of a high fat diet on the development of cancers and whether inhibition of lipogensis is a tractable pathway in these tumours.
  • Understanding the impact tumour suppressor loss has on metabolic alterations and whether nutrient supply influences disease trajectory
Other Activities
  • Member of the British Association for Cancer Research
  • Member of the European Association for Cancer Research
Major Funding
  • 2019-2022 - Barts Charity, Understanding the role of cancer metabolism at the nexus of diet and tumour microenvironment
Recent Publications

A micronutrient with major effects on cancer cell viability Kapara A, Vannini A, Peck B Nature Metabolism (13)

Lipid Metabolism at the Nexus of Diet and Tumor Microenvironment Peck B, Schulze A Trends in Cancer (2019) 5(7) 693-703

3D Growth of Cancer Cells Elicits Sensitivity to Kinase Inhibitors but Not Lipid Metabolism Modifiers. Jones DT, Valli A, Haider S et al. Molecular Cancer Therapeutics (2019) 18(1) 376-388
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30478149

The glutathione redox system is essential to prevent ferroptosis caused by impaired lipid metabolism in clear cell renal cell carcinoma Miess H, Dankworth B, Gouw AM et al. Oncogene (2018) 37(7) 5435-5450

Identification and Validation of Driver Kinases from Next-Generation Sequencing Data. Leonidou A, Peck B, Natrajan R Methods Mol Biol (2017) 1636(2) 179-195
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28730480

Utilizing Functional Genomics Screening to Identify Potentially Novel Drug Targets in Cancer Cell Spheroid Cultures. Morrison E, Wai P, Leonidou A et al. J Vis Exp (2016) (2)
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28060271

Three-dimensional modelling identifies novel genetic dependencies associated with breast cancer progression in the isogenic MCF10 model. Maguire SL, Peck B, Wai PT et al. J Pathol (2016) 240(2) 315-328
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27512948

Lipid desaturation - the next step in targeting lipogenesis in cancer? Peck B, Schulze A FEBS J (2016) 283(2) 2767-2778
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26881388

Inhibition of fatty acid desaturation is detrimental to cancer cell survival in metabolically compromised environments. Peck B, Schug ZT, Zhang Q et al. Cancer Metab (2016) 4(2) 6
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27042297

SREBP maintains lipid biosynthesis and viability of cancer cells under lipid- and oxygen-deprived conditions and defines a gene signature associated with poor survival in glioblastoma multiforme. Lewis CA, Brault C, Peck B et al. Oncogene (2015) 34(2) 5128-5140
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25619842

For additional publications, please click here
Biography

I studied Molecular Biology and Genetics at Royal Holloway (University of London) before moving to Imperial College London to complete a PhD in the role and regulation of forkhead transcription factors in breast cancer. In 2010 I moved to the London Research Institute (now the Crick Institute) to the lab of Prof. Almut Schulze to study cancer metabolism. This work focussed on identifying novel cancer-specific dependencies in cancer metabolism. As part of the Lipid metabolism consortium, we identified ACSS2 and SCD as fundamental dependencies of aggressive breast and prostate cancers.

In 2014 I moved to the lab of Dr. Rachael Natrajan identifying novel tumour suppressors in breast cancer. At the ICR we developed bespoke 3-dimensional (3D) screening pipelines and discovered novel genes, including CREBBP, KMT2C and NIPBL that impact disease progression and response to targeted therapies.