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Professor Trevor Graham
Professor of Cancer Evolution

My lab measures the patterns of clonal evolution that define carcinogenesis and develops novel mathematical tools for analysis and prediction. By characterising tumour evolution, we aim to find better ways to determine prognosis and more effective ways to treat cancers.

Dr Mirjana Efremova
Lecturer

We are interested in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that promote cancer cell plasticity and adaptation of tumour cells in metastatic niches and under therapeutic pressure.

Dr Stuart McDonald
Reader in Gastrointestinal Biology

Our main research areas are focused on understanding the evolution of Barrett’s oesophagus to cancer, field cancerisation of the human stomach, and clonal expansion in ductal carcinoma in situ of the human breast.

Professor Sir Nicholas Wright
Emeritus Professor of Histopathology

My research interests include clonal evolution in colorectal adenomas and inflammation-associated cancer, the nature of Barrett’s glands, and the design of methods to explore neutral drift in stem cell divisions in normal human tissues.

Dr Giulia Guiducci

My research activity aims to characterise lncRNAs involved in the maintenance of genomic stability and to understand how their dysregulation can lead to cancer development.

Dr Jacob Househam

I am a computational biologist focussing on understanding the evolutionary dynamics that underpin colorectal cancer progression.

Dr Florian Laforets

My research in Prof Balkwill’s group focuses on imaging tumour-associated macrophages and other immune cells in live ex vivo tumour slices, in order to assess their behaviour and the impact of immunotherapies on the live tumour microenvironment.

Dr Eszter Lakatos

I apply bioinformatic techniques and mathematical modelling to understand the evolutionary processes in colorectal cancer. My research focuses on the trade-offs a growing tumour population has to face for efficient growth and survival.