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Professor Nick Lemoine
Director, CRUK Barts Centre; Medical Director, NIHR Clinical Research Network

I am the Director of Barts Cancer Institute. My groups’ primary research interests are in the genomics and molecular pathology of pancreatic cancer and the development of oncolytic virotherapy.

Professor Fran Balkwill
Professor of Cancer Biology

My key area of interest is in cancer and the tumour microenvironment, especially in ovarian cancer. I study the links between cancer and inflammation and research ways of translating this to clinical trials.

Professor Jack Cuzick
Director, Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine

I am the Director of Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine and also Head of Centre for Cancer Prevention. My current interests are in cancer epidemiology and clinical trials, with special interest in prevention and screening.

Professor Stephen Duffy
Professor of Cancer Screening

My research activities are concentrated on cancer screening and early diagnosis. There is potential for considerable saving of lives from cancer if it were diagnosed at an earlier stage.

Professor Jude Fitzgibbon
Professor of Personalised Cancer Medicine

My research group works on molecular pathology, genetics and progression of leukaemia and lymphomas, aiming to improve on current diagnostic, prognostic and treatment strategies.

Professor Trevor Graham
Professor of Cancer Evolution

My lab measures the patterns of clonal evolution that define carcinogenesis and develops novel mathematical tools for analysis and prediction. By characterising tumour evolution, we aim to find better ways to determine prognosis and more effective ways to treat cancers.

Professor Kairbaan Hodivala-Dilke
Deputy Institute Director, Professor of the Tumour Microenvironment

Cancers are composed of both tumour and stromal compartments. We are interested in understanding the molecular basis of how the tumour stroma contributes to tumour growth, therapy resistance and spread, in various solid tumours including lung cancers, pancreatic cancer and melanoma.

Professor Hemant Kocher
Professor of Liver and Pancreas Surgery

My clinical research interests include tissue banking, clinical trials, innovative surgical techniques, epidemiology, meta-analysis and patient care pathways. My translational research interests include pancreatic cancer stroma and tumour-stroma cross-talk including cell signalling, adhesion, metastasis and invasion.

Professor Ranjit Manchanda
Consultant Gynaecological Oncologist, Professor of Gynaecological Oncology

My main research focus is based on the development of population based approaches to genetic testing for risk stratification, cancer prevention and using targeted surgical approaches for cancer prevention in gynaecological cancers.

Professor John F. Marshall
Professor of Tumour Biology

For over 25 years I have studied the biology of tumour invasion with a particular interest in the roles of the adhesion molecules expressed on the cell surface that mediate this process. Our group concentrates on the study of integrins that are the principal family of adhesion molecules that mediate interaction between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM).

Professor Tyson V. Sharp
Professor of Cellular and Molecular Biology

My group’s work focuses on the role of the tumour suppressor protein LIMD1 and its family members Ajuba and WTIP and how their deregulation in normal tissue contributes to the development of lung, renal and breast cancer.

Dr Katiuscia Bianchi
Senior Lecturer

I am interested in all the strategies cancer cells adopt to proliferate and evade cell death, in order to develop new therapeutic strategies. Specifically, my research focuses on how cancer cell metabolism affects tumour growth and investigating how inflammation can drive malignant transformation.

Dr Andrejs Braun
Senior Lecturer

I am interested in the mechanisms of tumour clearance in response to targeted therapy with monoclonal antibodies. I work on antibody therapies for lymphoma and the epigenetics of somatic hypermutation in normal and malignant B cells.

Dr Angus James Cameron
Senior Lecturer

My research focuses on kinases regulating cancer cell growth and motility to understand how and when to target them with drugs. My group is currently examining the role of the PKN kinases in malignant progression.

Professor Claude Chelala
Co-Director, Centre for Computational Biology, LSI; Professor of Bioinformatics

My research interests lie in the area of translational bioinformatics. Current research projects are focused in high-throughput data analysis, integration with clinical data, databases and software development, particularly for pancreatic cancer and breast cancer.

Professor Tatjana Crnogorac-Jurcevic
Professor of Molecular Oncology

My research focuses on molecular pathology of pancreatic cancer, in particular its development and progression. We are using this knowledge to develop biomarkers for early, non-invasive detection of this malignancy in urine specimens.

Dr Pedro R. Cutillas
Reader in Cell Signalling and Proteomics

My research group uses unique proteomics and computational approaches to understand how cell signalling pathways driven by the activity of protein kinases contribute to the development of cancer. Increasing this knowledge will be invaluable in advancing personalised cancer therapies.

Dr Jeff Davies
Reader in Haemato-oncology and Honorary Consultant

My group works on developing novel approaches to improve efficacy and safety of allogeneic stem cell transplantation and adoptive immunotherapy as treatments for blood cancers. We focus on T-cell alloreactivity in the context of stem cell transplantation and immunotherapy.

Dr Gabriella Ficz
Senior Lecturer

My group aims to discover the epigenetic changes taking place during cancer initiation and develop potential drugs that can prevent these changes which may be abnormal but reversible, before many damaging mutations occur.

Dr Paolo Gallipoli
Clinical Senior Lecturer in Haemato-Oncology

My research interests focus on mechanisms of disease initiation and maintenance and the identification and validation of novel therapeutic targets in myeloid leukaemias.

Dr Susana Godinho
Senior Lecturer

Our research group focuses on understanding how centrosome amplification impacts tumour progression and how we can target cells with amplified centrosomes to develop new cancer therapies.

Professor John Gribben
Professor of Medical Oncology

My group focuses on immunological approaches to the treatment of haematological cancers. My primary research interests include the immunotherapy of cancer (including stem cell transplantation), the identification of B-cell-tumour antigens; and the detection and treatment of minimal residual disease in leukaemia and lymphoma.

Professor Richard Grose
Professor of Cancer Cell Biology

We are interested in how cancer cells interact with each other and the microenvironment. We investigate how cancer cells develop resistance to therapies and design drug combination approaches to overcome this.

Dr Gunnel Halldén
Reader in Cancer Gene Therapy

The research in our team is focused on the development of novel treatment strategies to target prostate and pancreatic cancers using genetically modified viruses that target, replicate and kill cancer cells but leave normal cells unharmed.

Dr Zuzana Horejsi
Lecturer

My lab focuses on discovering functions of phosphorylation induced by damaged DNA in normal and cancer cells, and investigating the role of different phosphorylation events in cancer development.

Dr Li Jia
Senior Lecturer

I am interested in studying the effects of the inflammatory microenvironment on disease progression and resistance to treatment in haematological malignancies with emphasis on survival and mechanisms of treatment resistance in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and B cell lymphoma.

Professor Louise Jones
Professor of Breast Pathology

My research in breast cancer focuses on the progression of in-situ to invasive disease with the aims of identifying markers which can predict behaviour and novel therapeutic targets.

Dr Stéphanie Kermorgant
Reader in Cellular Oncology

We study the role of growth factor receptor signalling and intracellular trafficking (movement inside cells) in tumour growth and metastasis in the view of improving cancer therapy.

Professor Kamil R. Kranc
Clinical Professor of Haematology

Our research aims to understand the biology of leukaemia stem cells and identify tricks they use to escape treatments. My group employs multidisciplinary approaches to understand how HSCs chose to self-renew or differentiate and how these cell fate decisions are affected under pathological conditions to generate leukaemic stem cells.

Dr Sergey Krysov
Senior Lecturer

My studies concentrate on the immunogenetics of human B cell malignancies, such as chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, follicular lymphoma and the role for B cell receptor in the development of B cell lymphoma and leukaemia.

Dr Rifca Le Dieu
Clinical Senior Lecturer

I am the Module Lead for 3 undergraduate Biomedical Science Modules. I am also the Cancer Theme Lead for MBBS with direct responsibility for Year 2 Cancer Week. In addition, I supervise MSc project dissertations.

Dr Michelle Lockley
Reader in Medical Oncology, Honorary Consultant

Our lab aims to improve treatments for women with ovarian cancer, particularly those that are resistant to chemotherapy. We are interested in developing therapies that can adapt to the evolution of chemotherapy resistance over time.

Dr Daniela Loessner
Reader in Bioengineering and Cancer

My research interests are to apply tissue-engineered technologies to study the role of the microenvironment in modulating cancer progression and therapy response. I develop 3D models that mimic the human disease and use this to develop novel therapies.

Professor Yong-Jie Lu
Professor of Molecular Oncology

We aim to identify genetic alterations that influence cancer development, progression and therapeutic responses, in particular prostate cancer, and further develop them into biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and therapeutic stratification, with a current focus on circulating biomarkers.

Dr Faraz Mardakheh
Lecturer

My lab utilises state-of-art multi-omics methodologies to study how protein synthesis is dysregulated in cancer cells, and how this dysregulation contributes to various stages of cancer progression.

Dr Sarah Martin
Reader; Director of Graduate Studies for Research (BCI)

Our research is based on exploiting DNA repair defects in cancer for the identification of new personalised therapies. We use compound and siRNA screening to identify new therapeutics for tumours based on their specific DNA repair status.

Dr Sarah McClelland
Senior Lecturer

My lab aims to understand the mechanisms that underlie numerical and structural chromosome aberrations in cancer at a molecular level, which also involves understanding how normal cells replicate and segregate their genomes.

Dr Stuart McDonald
Senior Lecturer

Our main research areas are focused on understanding the evolution of Barrett’s oesophagus to cancer, field cancerisation of the human stomach, and clonal expansion in ductal carcinoma in situ of the human breast.

Dr Jessica Okosun
Clinical Senior Lecturer

My research focuses on understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms that underlie the initiation and progression of B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas in order to define clinically-relevant biomarkers.

Professor Bijendra Patel
Professor of Surgery (Laparoscopy and Surgery Skills)

I am a leading expert in establishing higher education degrees for acquiring operative surgical skills by simulation. I pioneered the Masters course in Surgical Skills and Sciences at Barts Cancer Institute and have set up a “Virtual Reality Surgical Simulation Centre” for training surgeons.

Dr Oliver M. Pearce
Lecturer

The focus of our research is the tumour microenvironment and we are particularly interested in understanding the composition and function of the tumour extracellular matrix in immunosuppression. Cancer types we focus on include ovarian and breast cancers.

Dr Barrie Peck
Lecturer

My lab aims to understand the alterations in metabolism that take place in cancer and investigate whether extrinsic factors, such as diet, influence cancer metabolism and disease trajectory. We then want to uncover whether these dependencies can be exploited therapeutically.

Professor Thomas Powles
Professor of Genitourinary Oncology, Director, Barts Cancer Centre, Lead for Solid Tumour Research

My main research interests are in genital and urinary cancers, leading a spectrum of clinical studies from phase I to randomised phase III. The majority of the studies are translational phase II studies investigating novel targeted and immune therapies.

Dr David Propper
Senior Lecturer

My focus is detailed translational trials in pancreatic cancer. I work with scientists within the BCI in crosscutting themes targeting the tumour microenvironment, with approaches including immune therapies, stem cell, stromal and vascular targeting.

Dr Prabhakar Rajan
Clinical Senior Lecturer in Urology

My laboratory research explores alternative pre-mRNA splicing in prostate cancer (PCa) biology, transcriptomic changes during PCa treatment, and liquid biopsy molecular biomarkers of treatment outcomes. My clinical research investigates patterns of treatment outcomes for PCa patients.

Dr Paulo Ribeiro
Senior Lecturer

Our research group is interested in uncovering the molecular mechanisms regulating tissue growth, invasion and metastasis using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a genetically tractable model organism.

Dr John Riches
Clinical Senior Lecturer

My major research interest is understanding the metabolism of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and lymphoma with the aim that this will underpin the development of the next generation of anti-metabolic drugs for these diseases.

Dr Kevin Rouault-Pierre
Lecturer

My main research interests are in haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and leukemic initiating cells. I seek to understand how intrinsic and extrinsic signals are integrated by normal and malignant stem cells.

Professor Peter Szlosarek
Professor of Medical Oncology

My main research interest is in exploring why ASS1 is aberrantly expressed in human cancers and how this knowledge may be exploited for anticancer therapy. I lead an active translational programme from bench to bedside of the arginine-depleting agent ADI-PEG20 in several hard-to-treat cancers.

Professor Victoria Sanz-Moreno
Professor of Cancer Cell Biology

Our research focuses on how the cytoskeleton of cancer cells regulates transcriptional rewiring during tumour growth and dissemination. We aim to understand how such rewiring affects the tumour microenvironment.

Professor Peter Schmid
Professor of Cancer Medicine

My research interests primarily focus on breast cancer, lung cancer and early drug development. I oversee clinical and translational research on immune checkpoint inhibitors and other immune strategies.

Dr Lovorka Stojic
Lecturer

My group studies how RNA-mediated mechanisms, in particular long noncoding RNAs, regulate cell division and how dysregulation of these processes leads to genome instability and cancer.

Dr Jane Sosabowski
Reader in Preclinical Molecular Imaging

My main interests are in radiopharmaceutical development and the use of pre-clinical molecular imaging in drug development, especially biopharmaceuticals. The lab has a long-standing interest in imaging CCK-2 and GRP receptors which are overexpressed in a number of tumour types.

Dr Jun Wang
Senior Lecturer

My main research interests lie in applying bioinformatics and computational approaches to analyse large-scale cancer datasets to uncover novel diagnostic and prognostic features. I also lead the CRUK Barts Centre Bioinformatics Core Facility.

Professor Yaohe Wang
Professor of Cancer Cell and Gene Therapy

We work on cancer prevention and immunotherapy using tumour-targeted replicating oncolytic viruses, in particular focusing on replicating adenovirus and vaccinia virus.

Dr Benjamin Werner
Lecturer

My group combines mathematics, computer simulations and genomic information to study evolutionary processes. We aim to understand how a tumour’s evolutionary history is reflected in its genome, how evolution can be quantified in individual tumours and how this information predicts future evolution.

Dr Bela Wrench
Clinical Senior Lecturer

My research focuses on the fundamental aspects of leukaemia initiating cell (LIC) biology in adult acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, with the aim of gaining fundamental insight into the underlying biology of LICs to reveal dependencies that are tractable targets for therapy.

Professor Ian Hart
Emeritus Professor of Tumour Biology

My main research interests have included how malignant cancers are able to invade, spread and metastasise and my research has focused on gaining a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in cancer progression.

Dr Simon Joel
Emeritus Reader in Cancer Pharmacology
Professor Andrew Lister
Emeritus Professor

My main interests are the development of improved therapy for lymphoma and leukaemia. I am Emeritus Gordon Hamilton Professor of Medical Oncology in the Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London.

Professor Tim Oliver
Emeritus Professor
Professor Rodney Reznek
Emeritus Professor

My main interests are in cancer imaging and imaging of endocrine disease. I am currently Professor Emeritus at the Barts Cancer Institute in Queen Mary University of London

Professor Ama Rohatiner
Emeritus Professor
Professor Sir Nicholas Wright
Emeritus Professor of Histopathology

My research interests include clonal evolution in colorectal adenomas and inflammation-associated cancer, the nature of Barrett’s glands, and the design of methods to explore neutral drift in stem cell divisions in normal human tissues.

Professor Bryan Young
Emeritus Professor
Dr Hannah Armes

The aim of my research project is to identify and functionally characterise candidate disease genes in familial leukaemia.

Dr Michael Allen

My research focuses on understanding the progression of early breast cancer (ductal carcinoma in situ – DCIS) to invasive disease and the role of the microenvironment in this process.

Dr Chinedu (Anthony) Anene

My current project aim is to develop novel molecular biomarkers for prostate cancer, a leading cause of male specific cancer death.

Dr Ann-Marie Baker

I am interested in understanding tumour evolution and stem cell biology within the human colon.

Dr Renato Brito Baleeiro

The primary focus of my research is to establish a platform for a neo-antigens-based vaccine for triple-negative breast cancer and pancreatic cancer.

Dr Opeoluwa Banwo

My research is focused on clinical informatics for the Pancreatic Cancer Research Fund Tissue Bank (PCRFTB).

Dr Findlay Redvers Bewicke-Copley

My work is currently focused on lymphoma, working on variant calling and gene expression analysis of NGS data.

Dr Katia Bouchekioua-Bouzaghou

My project aims to investigate how resistance mechanisms are acquired to a number of CDK4/6 inhibitors and to pinpoint new targets for therapy.

Dr David Britton

My project is focused on determining how certain proteins enable acute myeloid leukaemia blasts to acquire or have intrinsic resistance to chemotherapy, with the aim to identify suitable pharmaceutical alternatives to combat resistance.

Dr Juliana Candido

My research project aims to study the role of the immune cell infiltration in the tumour microenvironment of pancreatic cancer.

Dr Emanuela Carlotti

My project is focused on investigating the role of gland phenotype in the evolution of Barrett’s oesophagus to dysplasia.

Dr Edward Carter

My research is focused on understanding the early stages of breast cancer by using normal human breast cells obtained through the Breast Cancer Now tissue bank as building blocks to recreate a human breast duct in the laboratory environment.

Dr Pedro Casado-Izquierdo

My work is based on studying signalling networks in AML primary samples in order to predict responses to kinase inhibitors.

Dr Louisa Chard

Our research focuses on the use of modified, replicating oncolytic Vaccinia viruses and adenoviruses armed with immune-modulatory genes such as cytokines to create a self-propagating treatment for tumours that results in long-term immunological memory to the tumour cells.

Dr Suhnrita Chaudhuri

My research is focused on combining modulation of the tumour microenvironment with chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy in order to therapeutically target pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

Dr Natasha Clayton

Investigating the intracellular signalling mechanisms underlying the development of resistance to therapeutic RTK inhibitors, particularly in FGFR-driven cancers.

Dr Eve Coulter

My research focuses on novel strategies to enrich, isolate and characterise a chemo-resistant population in patients with follicular lymphoma.

Dr Marta Crespi-Sallan

My research is focused on describing the mechanisms underlying Lamin B1 nuclear disassembly in B-cell normal development and how a dis-regulated Lamin B1 removal pathway could lead to several haematological malignancies within the germinal centre in secondary lymph organs.

Dr Eva Crosas-Molist

In 2015 I was awarded a research associate position funded by Cancer Research UK to join Dr Sanz-Moreno for my postdoc, where I develop my research studying the crosstalk between the cytoskeleton and mitochondria during tumour progression and invasion.

Dr William Charles Hemming Cross

I am currently working on several projects related to colorectal cancer and its premalignant stages, including sporadic adenomas and inflammatory bowel disease.

Dr Danilo Cucchi

My main research is focused on the identification of DNA damage signatures that predict response to immune checkpoint blockade. I am also interested in the role of metabolism in the biology of both cancer cells and immune cells.

Dr Kit Curtius
UKRI/Rutherford Research Fellow

The aims of my current research are to use mathematical mechanistic modelling to inform optimal cancer screening recommendations, to perform patient risk stratification, and to ultimately better prognostication.

Dr Gabriela d’Amico Lago

My work is focused on understanding the roles of kinase and non-kinase motifs of FAK in controlling physiological angiogenesis in vivo. Overall my goal is to understand how to best control tumour blood vessels in the regulation of cancer.

Dr Silvana Debernardi

My work focuses on the global analysis of miRNA in pancreatic cancer and developing miRNA biomarkers for early detection of this malignancy.

Dr Maria Dermit

Using a multi-omics approach, my aim is to systematically reveal the relationship between RNA localisation and protein expression in mammalian cells, and assess how RNA localisation might be dysregulated in cancer cells in order to promote a more malignant phenotype.

Dr Jesus Gomez Escudero

I am involved in some projects that are focused in the stroma components of a tumour, particularly the endothelial vessels, and its potential role in some key processes including chemotherapy or metastasis.

Dr John Foster

My project focuses on understanding how the proteins involved in RNA binding and alternative splicing of pre-mRNA are regulated.

Dr Julie Foster

My areas of interest are imaging biochemical processes such as metabolism/proliferation (microPET), and the use of in vivo preclinical imaging in a range of applications.

Dr Marta Freitas

My work focuses on overcoming resistance to arginine deprivation therapy in mesothelioma.

Dr Daniel Friedman

My research is focused on investigating the crosstalk between immune cell subsets in the tumour microenvironment in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

Dr Emanuela Gadaleta

We are updating the bioinformatics data management system, expanding the analytical modules and functionalities, developing purpose-built graphical pug-ins and designing the bioinformatics infrastructure to allow the querying and analysis of data returned from projects using BCNTB tissues.

Dr Rathi Gangeswaran

My project is focused on the identification of molecular factors affecting adenoviral therapy.

Dr Ganga Gopinathan

My research project aims to investigate the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 as a major target in high grade serous carcinoma, with the hope of identifying targeted therapies for treatment.

Dr Michelle Goulart

My research is focused in understanding the tumour-stroma interactions in pancreatic cancer and the identification of potential biomarkers.

Dr Damien Goutte-Gattat

I am using fruit flies to investigate the role of tumour heterogeneity in the development of glioblastoma and the acquisition of resistance to chemotherapy.

Dr Miguel Hermida

My project studies the influence that the loss of the tumour suppressor protein LIMD1 has in renal and lung cancers by identifying selective drugs, targets and the cell signalling involved in order to improve the current therapy.

Dr Sara Farrah Heuss

My work focuses on c-Met signalling on endosomes in pancreatic cancer, and to evaluate how it can be exploited to benefit pancreatic cancer patients.

Dr James Heward

My research focuses on characterising epigenetic therapies for the “epigenetically addicted” germinal centre lymphomas.

Dr Quentin Heydt

My research focuses on the fundamental aspects of leukaemia initiating cell biology in adult acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

Dr Maruan Hijazi-Vega

My work is focused on producing systematic classification of phosphorylation sites detectable by mass spectrometry that will provide new insights into the complexity and topology of kinase signalling.

Dr Joseph Hoare

My work focuses on investigating our novel panel of chemotherapy resistant cells to identify drugs that enhance the activity of oncolytic adenovirus in chemoresistant high grade serous cancer.

Dr Roxana Kashani

My research involves the conjugation and radiolabelling of antibodies, small proteins and peptides with radioisotopes followed by HPLC/TLC validation and in vitro radioligand binding assays.

Dr Faraz Khan
Bioinformatician

I am a Bioinformatician working on the development of pipelines for NGS data analysis, including mutational calling, Single-Cell RNA-seq, ChIP peak calling and methylation, variant annotation and prioritisation, as well as multi-layer data integration strategy and tools.

Dr Florian Laforets

My research in Prof Balkwill’s group focuses on imaging tumour-associated macrophages and other immune cells in live ex vivo tumour slices, in order to assess their behaviour and the impact of immunotherapies on the live tumour microenvironment.

Dr Eszter Lakatos

I apply bioinformatic techniques and mathematical modelling to understand the evolutionary processes in colorectal cancer. My research focuses on the trade-offs a growing tumour population has to face for efficient growth and survival.

Dr Peng Liu

I am interested in cancer prevention and immunotherapy using tumour-targeted replicating oncolytic viruses.

Dr Oscar Maiques

My research will focus on studying Myosin II function during melanoma progression and its cross-talk with inflammatory and immune responses.

Dr Eleni Maniati

My research project aims to integrate multi-omic molecular and histological data datasets of the microenvironment of HGSOC metastases. This work will allow us to identify key microenvironmental components and pathways that sustain and promote tumours.

Dr Giulia Marelli

I am investigating the use of virotherapeutic strategies for treating pancreatic cancer. Our research focuses on the use of modified oncolytic Vaccinia viruses armed with immune-modulatory genes such as cytokines to create a novel treatment for tumours.

Dr Lauren Maskell

My research is focused on the coating and modifying of a prostate selective oncolytic adenovirus to enable systemic delivery, eliminate metastases and induce tumour immunity.

Dr Alice Mazzagatti

Our work aims to better understand aneuploidy tolerance in cancer, in particular with regard to monosomy in AML.

Dr Shinelle G. Menezes

My work focuses on the influence of PKN2 on the immune-microenvironment, and the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in vivo, using murine models.

Dr Kate Moore

My research is focused on understanding how integrins help cancer cells invade and metastasise, as well as how we can use integrins as biomarkers of disease and therapeutic targets.

Dr Maximilian Mossner

My research is focussed on the disturbed epigenomic landscape within pancreatic tumours.

In particular, I investigate the bi-directional epigenetic reprogramming between the tumour microenvironment and pancreatic cancer stem cells that leads to cooperative tumour outgrowth.

Dr Jose Munoz-Felix

My main project is to use a CRIPSR screen to identify novel vascular promotion/chemosensitisation targets. Additionally, I am investigating the utility of this approach in the treatment of other fibrotic diseases.

Dr Marie Nollet

Our group has shown that internalised c-Met traffics through endomembranes positive for LC3B and Beclin1. Furthermore, c-Met sustains signalling from Autophagy Related Endomembranes, ARE. We hypothesised therefore that the AREs supporting c-Met trafficking and signalling belong to a novel non-canonical pathway.

Dr Jose Orgaz

My research focuses on cutaneous melanoma biology, a highly aggressive and metastatic cancer. I aim to get more insights into signalling pathways underlying melanoma progression and responses to current therapies. In particular, I am interested in the role of the actomyosin cytoskeleton in drug resistance.

Dr Jorge Oscanoa

I am developing SNPnexus, a software dedicated to improving our understanding of the functional role of genetic variations to prioritise clinically relevant ones facilitating the promise of precision medicine.

Dr Giuseppe Palladino

The goal of my research is to understand the mechanisms that determine the course of cancer evolution. My current focus is the investigation of the transcriptional and the epigenetic regulation arising during the evolution and progression of follicular lymphoma.

Dr Adam Passman

I am investigating the role of the microenvironment on gland phenotype in the evolution of Barrett’s oesophagus to dysplasia.

Dr Rita Pedrosa

My work will identify other players in the regulation of angiocrine signalling using a CRISPR screen. I will also explore the molecular mechanisms underlying how FAK controls angiocrine signalling.

Dr Celine Philippe

My project focuses on the translation reprogramming in acute myeloid leukaemia upon stresses such as chemotherapy.

Dr Stefano Pirro

My research focuses on enhancing the freely-available Breast Cancer Now Tissue Bank bioinformatics portal (BCNTBbp) and its analytical layer to build a ‘multi-omic’ integration system for BCNTB returned data.

Dr Deepak Raj

I work on developing preclinical models of chimeric antigen receptors for cell therapy of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

Dr Ana Rio-Machin

My research project aims to identify germline mutations in families with leukaemia of unknown aetiology and study the intra and inter leukaemia heterogeneity observed in these families, through examination of clonal evolution and secondary genetic events.

Dr Irene Rodriguez-Hernandez

My research is focused on investigating the role of ROCK-Myosin II in tumour and metastasis initiation.

Dr Helen Ross-Adams

The aim of my work is to develop clinically-relevant biomarkers that could aid in earlier disease detection, predict treatment response, and inform clinical management of patients.

Dr Michael Rushton

The aim of my research is to use the reprogramming of primed embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from the embryo inner cell mass (ICM) to ground state ESCs as a tool for elucidating the mechanisms involved in the regulation of DNA demethylation.

Dr Remi Samain

My research is focused on understanding the role of contractility in pancreatic cancer.

Dr Emily Saunderson

I am interested in understanding whether epigenetics can play a driving role in the transition from normal to transformed cells in the breast.

Dr Jayeta Saxena

My research is focused on using a novel panel of chemo-resistant high grade serous ovarian cancer cells to discover new treatments that resensitise our cells to cis- and carboplatin.

Dr Kunal Shah

I am studying how the tumour suppressor gene LIMD1 functions in the microRNA pathway, a gene regulatory pathway that is often dysregulated in cancer.

Dr Nadeem Shaikh

We are using a variety of molecular and cytological techniques to study the mechanisms underlying chromosomal instability (CIN) in high grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) that allow these highly adaptable tumours to become drug resistant.

Dr Alice Shia

My main research focus is investigating the changes in circulating nucleic acids in blood samples from patients recruited in clinical trials. We are interested in how we can use non-invasive techniques to detect changes in tumour DNA and correlate that to patient outcome.

Dr Vera Silva

I am trying to understand how new drugs in combination with carboplatin can help bypass therapy resistance in ovarian cancer.

Dr Judith Simon

Our study aims to investigate the role of centrosome amplification on changing the tumour microenviroment using in vitro and in vivo models.

Dr Filomena Spada

My research involves using mass cytometry based analysis to characterise the interaction, activation, and signalling capacity of B and T-cells in CLL and other B-cell malignancies.

Dr Kirtiman Srivastava

My research is focused on pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC), primarily the identification and quantification of PDAC biomarkers in patient urine samples and understanding the biology of cancerous transformation.

Dr Naoka Taylor

High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) represents the major subtype of ovarian cancer and displays high levels of chromosomal instability.

We are collaborating with the Balkwill and Lockley laboratories to investigate mechanisms driving chromosomal instability in gynaecological cancers.

Dr Graeme Thorn

My research focuses on the bioinformatic analyses of DNA methylation of circulating tumour DNA and the use of DNA methylation as a biomarker for breast cancer prognosis.

Dr Dayem Ullah

My role focuses on the design and implementation of a data management system for a pancreatic tissue bank hosted by the Institute.

My interest also lies in the development of various web-based computational analyses and data mining tools for biological research.

Dr Louie van de Lagemaat

I use computational biology techniques to understand how normal RNA regulatory mechanisms used in development are hijacked in cancers.

Dr Pengju Wang

My work focuses on cancer immunotherapy using oncolytic viruses (vaccinia virus and adenovirus) and engineered T cells. I will also be looking at the state of immune cells in the tumour microenvironment.

Dr Marc Williams

I apply mathematical and computational approaches to understanding cancer evolution. A lot of my work is inspired by population genetics and evolutionary biology and I have been developing ways to adapt methods and theories from these fields to the study of cancer as an evolutionary system.

Dr Chrysi Xintaropoulou

The aim of my research is to elucidate the biology of leukaemia initiating cells, responsible for disease recurrence, in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

Dr Ruoyan Xu

My project focuses on understating mechanisms leading to aerobic glycolysis in cancer cells. In order to do this, I am implementing techniques and protocols to study mitochondrial and cellular metabolism, focusing in particular on methods based on mass spectrometry.

Dr Ming Yuan

My research focus is on cancer immunotherapy using oncolytic viruses (vaccinia virus) and engineered T cells.