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Our pancreatic cancer research

19th November 2020

November is Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month and today (19th November) is World Pancreatic Cancer Day. Join us in looking back at some of our pancreatic cancer research from the last year.

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Protein powerhouses – Q&A with Dr Mardakheh

9th November 2020

We spoke with Dr Faraz Mardakheh from Barts Cancer Institute’s Centre for Cancer Cell and Molecular Biology about his most recent research paper, published today in Developmental Cell. The study sheds lights on how invasive cancer cells increase their protein-making capacity in order to boost their growth and invasive capabilities, and identifies a key player involved in this process, which may represent a target for therapeutic interventions.

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Protecting blood against premature ageing

9th November 2020

Researchers from Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, and the University of Edinburgh have discovered a key protein that supports the production of healthy blood cells throughout life by regulating the inflammatory response. This is the first study to identify a protein that directly keeps in check blood stem cells’ immune responses to protect them from excessive damage and premature ageing.

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Student receives nationally recognised certificate

26th October 2020

Congratulations to Ryan McWilliams who has been awarded the Laparoscopic Passport (LapPass) – a certificate of proficiency in surgical skills that is recognised nationwide. Ryan is the first intercalating MBBS student undertaking the MSc Laparoscopic Surgery and Surgical Skills programme at Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, to get a LapPass in the UK.

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Aggressive melanoma cells at edge of tumours are key to cancer spread

20th October 2020

Research led by Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, has revealed novel insights into the mechanisms employed by melanoma cells to form tumours at secondary sites around the body. The findings from the study may help to identify new targets to inhibit melanoma spread and guide treatment decisions in the clinic.

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Novel insights into graft-versus-host disease

13th October 2020

Research led by Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, has identified a subset of immune cells involved in site-specific tissue damage in cancer patients who have developed harmful graft-versus-host disease after stem cell transplantation. The insights gained from the study may help to define new targets for more selective approaches to prevent or treat this condition in patients who have received a stem cell transplant.

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