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Biological clues in tissues surrounding breast tumours

9th September 2020

A new study has identified molecular characteristics in ‘normal-looking’ tissues surrounding breast tumours that may indicate whether breast cancer is likely to return following surgical removal of the tumour.

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Broadening cancer gene testing

21st July 2020

Screening entire populations for breast and ovarian cancer gene mutations could prevent millions more cancer cases across the world compared to current clinical practice, according to an international study led by Queen Mary University of London.

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The TME: Key to controlling cancer cell growth

10th March 2020

The tumour microenvironment: Key to controlling cancer cell growth Research led by Barts Cancer Institute (BCI), Queen Mary University of London, reveals novel insights into the role of the tumour microenvironment (TME) in the regulation of cancer growth. Gaining a more comprehensive understanding of the communication between cancer cells and their TME, and how these […]

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Immune therapy reduces risk of recurrence in aggressive breast cancer

27th February 2020

An immune therapy for the most aggressive form of breast cancer can substantially reduce the risk of the disease returning, according to a clinical trial led by Professor Peter Schmid of Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London.

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IBIS-II – new results from international breast cancer study

12th December 2019

The Queen Mary University of London professor leading an international breast cancer study says anastrozole – rather than tamoxifen – should be the preventive drug-of-choice for post-menopausal women at increased risk of developing the disease.

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Call for genetic screening for all breast cancer patients

3rd October 2019

A lifetime model evaluating the financial, health and social impact of multigene testing at diagnosis for all breast cancer patients was found to save lives and be extremely cost-effective for both UK and US health systems.

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