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Investigating new treatment targets for lymphoma, and beyond

5th May 2022

We spoke with Dr John Riches, Clinical Senior Lecturer in the Centre for Haemato-Oncology at Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, about his team’s recent publication, which describes a new potential treatment target for a subset of lymphomas.

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Study suggests simple blood test could help to monitor pancreatic cancer patients

28th April 2022

Researchers from Barts Cancer Institute at Queen Mary University of London have found it is possible to identify and track genetic variations in the tumours of patients with pancreatic cancer using a simple blood test.

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Rewiring the biology of leukaemia cells to reverse drug resistance

20th April 2022

Researchers from Barts Cancer Institute at Queen Mary University of London have identified a way to reverse resistance to a group of cancer drugs, known as kinase inhibitors, in leukaemia cells. By rewiring the inner workings of the cancer cells, the team was able to prime leukaemia cells for sensitivity to treatment in the laboratory.

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Understanding the evolution of Barrett’s oesophagus to cancer

17th February 2022

February is Oesophageal Cancer Awareness Month. At Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, a key area of research focus is on a condition that can precede oesophageal cancer called Barrett’s oesophagus.

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Immunotherapy significantly reduces recurrence in aggressive breast cancer

10th February 2022

An immunotherapy drug called ‘pembrolizumab’ has been shown to significantly reduce disease recurrence in patients with the most aggressive type of breast cancer, according to results from a phase III clinical trial led by Professor Peter Schmid from Queen Mary University of London and Barts Health NHS Trust.

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Targeting healthy cells changes invasive behaviour of pancreatic cancer

25th January 2022

Researchers from Barts Cancer Institute at Queen Mary University of London, led by Dr Angus Cameron, have found a way to modulate the invasive behaviour of pancreatic cancer by targeting a non-cancerous cell type found within pancreatic tumours. The findings, published in Cell Reports, provide valuable insights into the biology of pancreatic cancer progression, and could help to drive improvements in cancer treatment.

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