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Professor Nick Lemoine
Director, CRUK Barts Centre; Medical Director, NIHR Clinical Research Network

I am the Director of Barts Cancer Institute. My groups’ primary research interests are in the genomics and molecular pathology of pancreatic cancer and the development of oncolytic virotherapy.

Professor Trevor Graham
Professor of Cancer Evolution

My lab measures the patterns of clonal evolution that define carcinogenesis and develops novel mathematical tools for analysis and prediction. By characterising tumour evolution, we aim to find better ways to determine prognosis and more effective ways to treat cancers.

Professor Claude Chelala
Co-Director, Centre for Computational Biology, LSI; Professor of Bioinformatics

My research interests lie in the area of translational bioinformatics. Current research projects are focused in high-throughput data analysis, integration with clinical data, databases and software development, particularly for pancreatic cancer and breast cancer.

Dr Pedro R. Cutillas
Reader in Cell Signalling and Proteomics

My research group uses unique proteomics and computational approaches to understand how cell signalling pathways driven by the activity of protein kinases contribute to the development of cancer. Increasing this knowledge will be invaluable in advancing personalised cancer therapies.

Dr Faraz Mardakheh
Lecturer

My lab utilises state-of-art multi-omics methodologies to study how protein synthesis is dysregulated in cancer cells, and how this dysregulation contributes to various stages of cancer progression.

Dr Jessica Okosun
Clinical Senior Lecturer

My research focuses on understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms that underlie the initiation and progression of B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas in order to define clinically-relevant biomarkers.

Dr Jun Wang
Senior Lecturer

My main research interests lie in applying bioinformatics and computational approaches to analyse large-scale cancer datasets to uncover novel diagnostic and prognostic features. I also lead the CRUK Barts Centre Bioinformatics Core Facility.

Dr Opeoluwa Banwo

My research is focused on clinical informatics for the Pancreatic Cancer Research Fund Tissue Bank (PCRFTB).

Dr Findlay Redvers Bewicke-Copley

My work is currently focused on lymphoma, working on variant calling and gene expression analysis of NGS data.

Dr William Charles Hemming Cross

I am currently working on several projects related to colorectal cancer and its premalignant stages, including sporadic adenomas and inflammatory bowel disease.

Dr Kit Curtius
UKRI/Rutherford Research Fellow

The aims of my current research are to use mathematical mechanistic modelling to inform optimal cancer screening recommendations, to perform patient risk stratification, and to ultimately better prognostication.

Dr Emanuela Gadaleta

We are updating the bioinformatics data management system, expanding the analytical modules and functionalities, developing purpose-built graphical pug-ins and designing the bioinformatics infrastructure to allow the querying and analysis of data returned from projects using BCNTB tissues.

Dr Damien Goutte-Gattat

I am using fruit flies to investigate the role of tumour heterogeneity in the development of glioblastoma and the acquisition of resistance to chemotherapy.

Dr Faraz Khan
Bioinformatician

I am a Bioinformatician working on the development of pipelines for NGS data analysis, including mutational calling, Single-Cell RNA-seq, ChIP peak calling and methylation, variant annotation and prioritisation, as well as multi-layer data integration strategy and tools.

Dr Florian Laforets

My research in Prof Balkwill’s group focuses on imaging tumour-associated macrophages and other immune cells in live ex vivo tumour slices, in order to assess their behaviour and the impact of immunotherapies on the live tumour microenvironment.

Dr Eszter Lakatos

I apply bioinformatic techniques and mathematical modelling to understand the evolutionary processes in colorectal cancer. My research focuses on the trade-offs a growing tumour population has to face for efficient growth and survival.

Dr Eleni Maniati

My research project aims to integrate multi-omic molecular and histological data datasets of the microenvironment of HGSOC metastases. This work will allow us to identify key microenvironmental components and pathways that sustain and promote tumours.

Dr Maximilian Mossner

My research is focussed on the disturbed epigenomic landscape within pancreatic tumours.

In particular, I investigate the bi-directional epigenetic reprogramming between the tumour microenvironment and pancreatic cancer stem cells that leads to cooperative tumour outgrowth.

Dr Jorge Oscanoa

I am developing SNPnexus, a software dedicated to improving our understanding of the functional role of genetic variations to prioritise clinically relevant ones facilitating the promise of precision medicine.

Dr Stefano Pirro

My research focuses on enhancing the freely-available Breast Cancer Now Tissue Bank bioinformatics portal (BCNTBbp) and its analytical layer to build a ‘multi-omic’ integration system for BCNTB returned data.

Dr Irene Rodriguez-Hernandez

My research is focused on investigating the role of ROCK-Myosin II in tumour and metastasis initiation.

Dr Helen Ross-Adams

The aim of my work is to develop clinically-relevant biomarkers that could aid in earlier disease detection, predict treatment response, and inform clinical management of patients.

Dr Kunal Shah

I am studying how the tumour suppressor gene LIMD1 functions in the microRNA pathway, a gene regulatory pathway that is often dysregulated in cancer.

Dr Graeme Thorn

My research focuses on the bioinformatic analyses of DNA methylation of circulating tumour DNA and the use of DNA methylation as a biomarker for breast cancer prognosis.

Dr Dayem Ullah

My role focuses on the design and implementation of a data management system for a pancreatic tissue bank hosted by the Institute.

My interest also lies in the development of various web-based computational analyses and data mining tools for biological research.

Dr Louie van de Lagemaat

I use computational biology techniques to understand how normal RNA regulatory mechanisms used in development are hijacked in cancers.

Dr Marc Williams

I apply mathematical and computational approaches to understanding cancer evolution. A lot of my work is inspired by population genetics and evolutionary biology and I have been developing ways to adapt methods and theories from these fields to the study of cancer as an evolutionary system.