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Professor Jude Fitzgibbon
Professor of Personalised Cancer Medicine

My research group works on molecular pathology, genetics and progression of leukaemia and lymphomas, aiming to improve on current diagnostic, prognostic and treatment strategies.

Dr Roberto Bellelli
Lecturer

My lab aims to understand the basic mechanisms controlling DNA replication in mammalian cells and how disruption of this process leads to genomic instability and cancer.

Dr Gabriella Ficz
Senior Lecturer

My group aims to discover the epigenetic changes taking place during cancer initiation and develop potential drugs that can prevent these changes which may be abnormal but reversible, before many damaging mutations occur.

Dr Susana Godinho
Reader in Cancer Cell Biology

Our research group focuses on understanding how centrosome amplification impacts tumour progression and how we can target cells with amplified centrosomes to develop new cancer therapies.

Professor Yong-Jie Lu
Professor of Molecular Oncology

We aim to identify genetic alterations that influence cancer development, progression and therapeutic responses, in particular prostate cancer, and further develop them into biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and therapeutic stratification, with a current focus on circulating biomarkers.

Dr Sarah Martin
Reader in Cancer Cell Biology; Director of Graduate Studies for Research (BCI)

Our research group is involved in investigating nuclear and mitochondrial DNA repair as a therapeutic target in cancer. In particular, we have focused on the DNA mismatch repairĀ (MMR) pathway, the system for recognising and repairing mistakes in DNA replication and so preventing genetic mutations.

Dr Sarah McClelland
Reader in Cancer Cell Biology

My lab aims to understand the mechanisms that underlie numerical and structural chromosome aberrations in cancer at a molecular level, which also involves understanding how normal cells replicate and segregate their genomes.

Dr Jessica Okosun
Clinical Senior Lecturer

My research focuses on understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms that underlie the initiation and progression of B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas in order to define clinically-relevant biomarkers.

Dr Prabhakar Rajan
Clinical Senior Lecturer in Urology

My laboratory research explores alternative pre-mRNA splicing in prostate cancer (PCa) biology, and liquid biopsy-derived molecular biomarkers of treatment outcomes.

Dr Paulo Ribeiro
Senior Lecturer

Our research group is interested in uncovering the molecular mechanisms regulating tissue growth, invasion and metastasis using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a genetically tractable model organism.

Dr John Riches
Clinical Senior Lecturer

My major research interest is understanding the metabolism of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and lymphoma with the aim that this will underpin the development of the next generation of anti-metabolic drugs for these diseases.

Dr Jun Wang
Senior Lecturer

I have broad research interests and experience in bioinformatics, cancer genomics and data analytics. These research areas mainly involve developing and applying bioinformatics and computational approaches to analyse large-scale cancer datasets to uncover novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. I also lead the Cancer Research UK Barts Centre Bioinformatics Core Facility.

Dr Benjamin Werner
Lecturer

My group combines mathematics, computer simulations and genomic information to study evolutionary processes. We aim to understand how a tumour’s evolutionary history is reflected in its genome, how evolution can be quantified in individual tumours and how this information predicts future evolution.

Dr Bela Wrench
Clinical Senior Lecturer

My research focuses on the fundamental aspects of leukaemia initiating cell (LIC) biology in adult acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, with the aim of gaining fundamental insight into the underlying biology of LICs to reveal dependencies that are tractable targets for therapy.

Dr Findlay Redvers Bewicke-Copley

My work is currently focused on lymphoma, working on variant calling and gene expression analysis of NGS data.

Dr Eve Coulter

My research focuses on novel strategies to enrich, isolate and characterise a chemo-resistant population in patients with follicular lymphoma.

Dr Marta Crespi-Sallan

My research is focused on describing the mechanisms underlying Lamin B1 nuclear disassembly in B-cell normal development and how a dis-regulated Lamin B1 removal pathway could lead to several haematological malignancies within the germinal centre in secondary lymph organs.

Dr Silvana Debernardi

My work focuses on the global analysis of miRNA in pancreatic cancer and developing miRNA biomarkers for early detection of this malignancy.

Dr John Foster

My project focuses on understanding how the proteins involved in RNA binding and alternative splicing of pre-mRNA are regulated.

Dr Giulia Guiducci

My research activity aims to characterise lncRNAs involved in the maintenance of genomic stability and to understand how their dysregulation can lead to cancer development.

Dr Jorge Oscanoa

I am developing SNPnexus, a software dedicated to improving our understanding of the functional role of genetic variations to prioritise clinically relevant ones facilitating the promise of precision medicine.

Dr Helen Ross-Adams

The aim of my work is to develop clinically-relevant biomarkers that could aid in earlier disease detection, predict treatment response, and inform clinical management of patients.

Dr Emily Saunderson

I am interested in understanding whether epigenetics can play a driving role in the transition from normal to transformed cells in the breast.

Dr Aashika Sekar

Using the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, I aim to dissect the role played by protein phosphatases in regulating the tissue growth controlling Hippo signalling pathway, which has commonly been implicated in cancer development, progression and metastasis.

Dr Nadeem Shaikh

We are using a variety of molecular and cytological techniques to study the mechanisms underlying chromosomal instability (CIN) in high grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) that allow these highly adaptable tumours to become drug resistant.

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