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Professor Jude Fitzgibbon
Professor of Personalised Cancer Medicine

My research group works on molecular pathology, genetics and progression of leukaemia and lymphomas, aiming to improve on current diagnostic, prognostic and treatment strategies.

Dr Gabriella Ficz
Senior Lecturer

My group aims to discover the epigenetic changes taking place during cancer initiation and develop potential drugs that can prevent these changes which may be abnormal but reversible, before many damaging mutations occur.

Dr Susana Godinho
Senior Lecturer

Our research group focuses on understanding how centrosome amplification impacts tumour progression and how we can target cells with amplified centrosomes to develop new cancer therapies.

Professor Yong-Jie Lu
Professor of Molecular Oncology

We aim to identify genetic alterations that influence cancer development, progression and therapeutic responses, in particular prostate cancer, and further develop them into biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and therapeutic stratification, with a current focus on circulating biomarkers.

Dr Sarah Martin
Reader; Director of Graduate Studies for Research (BCI)

Our research is based on exploiting DNA repair defects in cancer for the identification of new personalised therapies. We use compound and siRNA screening to identify new therapeutics for tumours based on their specific DNA repair status.

Dr Sarah McClelland
Senior Lecturer

My lab aims to understand the mechanisms that underlie numerical and structural chromosome aberrations in cancer at a molecular level, which also involves understanding how normal cells replicate and segregate their genomes.

Dr Jessica Okosun
Clinical Senior Lecturer

My research focuses on understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms that underlie the initiation and progression of B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas in order to define clinically-relevant biomarkers.

Dr Prabhakar Rajan
Clinical Senior Lecturer in Urology

My laboratory research explores alternative pre-mRNA splicing in prostate cancer (PCa) biology, transcriptomic changes during PCa treatment, and liquid biopsy molecular biomarkers of treatment outcomes. My clinical research investigates patterns of treatment outcomes for PCa patients.

Dr Paulo Ribeiro
Senior Lecturer

Our research group is interested in uncovering the molecular mechanisms regulating tissue growth, invasion and metastasis using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a genetically tractable model organism.

Dr John Riches
Clinical Senior Lecturer

My major research interest is understanding the metabolism of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and lymphoma with the aim that this will underpin the development of the next generation of anti-metabolic drugs for these diseases.

Dr Kevin Rouault-Pierre
Lecturer

My main research interests are in haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and leukemic initiating cells. I seek to understand how intrinsic and extrinsic signals are integrated by normal and malignant stem cells.

Dr Jun Wang
Senior Lecturer

My main research interests lie in applying bioinformatics and computational approaches to analyse large-scale cancer datasets to uncover novel diagnostic and prognostic features. I also lead the CRUK Barts Centre Bioinformatics Core Facility.

Dr Benjamin Werner
Lecturer

My group combines mathematics, computer simulations and genomic information to study evolutionary processes. We aim to understand how a tumour’s evolutionary history is reflected in its genome, how evolution can be quantified in individual tumours and how this information predicts future evolution.

Dr Bela Wrench
Clinical Senior Lecturer

My research focuses on the fundamental aspects of leukaemia initiating cell (LIC) biology in adult acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, with the aim of gaining fundamental insight into the underlying biology of LICs to reveal dependencies that are tractable targets for therapy.

Dr Ann-Marie Baker

I am interested in understanding tumour evolution and stem cell biology within the human colon.

Dr Findlay Redvers Bewicke-Copley

My work is currently focused on lymphoma, working on variant calling and gene expression analysis of NGS data.

Dr Juliana Candido

My research project aims to study the role of the immune cell infiltration in the tumour microenvironment of pancreatic cancer.

Dr Eve Coulter

My research focuses on novel strategies to enrich, isolate and characterise a chemo-resistant population in patients with follicular lymphoma.

Dr Marta Crespi-Sallan

My research is focused on describing the mechanisms underlying Lamin B1 nuclear disassembly in B-cell normal development and how a dis-regulated Lamin B1 removal pathway could lead to several haematological malignancies within the germinal centre in secondary lymph organs.

Dr William Charles Hemming Cross

I am currently working on several projects related to colorectal cancer and its premalignant stages, including sporadic adenomas and inflammatory bowel disease.

Dr Silvana Debernardi

My work focuses on the global analysis of miRNA in pancreatic cancer and developing miRNA biomarkers for early detection of this malignancy.

Dr John Foster

My project focuses on understanding how the proteins involved in RNA binding and alternative splicing of pre-mRNA are regulated.

Dr Damien Goutte-Gattat

I am using fruit flies to investigate the role of tumour heterogeneity in the development of glioblastoma and the acquisition of resistance to chemotherapy.

Dr James Heward

My research focuses on characterising epigenetic therapies for the “epigenetically addicted” germinal centre lymphomas.

Dr Eszter Lakatos

I apply bioinformatic techniques and mathematical modelling to understand the evolutionary processes in colorectal cancer. My research focuses on the trade-offs a growing tumour population has to face for efficient growth and survival.

Dr Alice Mazzagatti

Our work aims to better understand aneuploidy tolerance in cancer, in particular with regard to monosomy in AML.

Dr Maximilian Mossner

My research is focussed on the disturbed epigenomic landscape within pancreatic tumours.

In particular, I investigate the bi-directional epigenetic reprogramming between the tumour microenvironment and pancreatic cancer stem cells that leads to cooperative tumour outgrowth.

Dr Jorge Oscanoa

I am developing SNPnexus, a software dedicated to improving our understanding of the functional role of genetic variations to prioritise clinically relevant ones facilitating the promise of precision medicine.

Dr Helen Ross-Adams

The aim of my work is to develop clinically-relevant biomarkers that could aid in earlier disease detection, predict treatment response, and inform clinical management of patients.

Dr Michael Rushton

The aim of my research is to use the reprogramming of primed embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from the embryo inner cell mass (ICM) to ground state ESCs as a tool for elucidating the mechanisms involved in the regulation of DNA demethylation.

Dr Emily Saunderson

I am interested in understanding whether epigenetics can play a driving role in the transition from normal to transformed cells in the breast.

Dr Jayeta Saxena

My research is focused on using a novel panel of chemo-resistant high grade serous ovarian cancer cells to discover new treatments that resensitise our cells to cis- and carboplatin.

Dr Nadeem Shaikh

We are using a variety of molecular and cytological techniques to study the mechanisms underlying chromosomal instability (CIN) in high grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) that allow these highly adaptable tumours to become drug resistant.

Dr Judith Simon

Our study aims to investigate the role of centrosome amplification on changing the tumour microenviroment using in vitro and in vivo models.

Dr Naoka Taylor

High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) represents the major subtype of ovarian cancer and displays high levels of chromosomal instability.

We are collaborating with the Balkwill and Lockley laboratories to investigate mechanisms driving chromosomal instability in gynaecological cancers.

Dr Graeme Thorn

My research focuses on the bioinformatic analyses of DNA methylation of circulating tumour DNA and the use of DNA methylation as a biomarker for breast cancer prognosis.

Dr Marc Williams

I apply mathematical and computational approaches to understanding cancer evolution. A lot of my work is inspired by population genetics and evolutionary biology and I have been developing ways to adapt methods and theories from these fields to the study of cancer as an evolutionary system.